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Saturday, October 3, 2009

In Other Book News...

Are you tired of book reviews, yet? I told you I had been reading a lot, lately. Grin.



The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick: Excellent children's fiction. The book looks like a whopper (533 pages), but many of the pages are illustrations that propell the story forward, and many of the pages have little text on them. Intruiging story! Levi and Russ both read it also and loved it.


Triangular Road: A Memoir by Paule Marshall: A spontaneous grab at the library. Interesting memoir, but I particularly enjoyed the small peek into the life of Langston Hughes as well.



A Murder is Announced by Agatha Christie: Agatha Christie is a master. Her plots are wonderful and unexpected.



The Book of Three by Lloyd Alexander: I was stretching my literary world to include a little more in the fantasy relm (due to the tastes of my hubby and oldest son). The Chronicles of Prydain seemed like a good place to start, as I've seen it recommended over and over again. The Book of Three was well-written (if out of my normal comfort zone), and I'm looking forward to reading the other books in the series. Russ enjoyed the series, and I may add it to Levi's stack in a couple years.

The Hidden Treasure of Glaston by Eleanore M. Jewett: I've read a few of the Living History Library books aloud to Levi this year (Beorn the Proud, Beowulf, and Son of Charlemagne), and we both find that history comes alive within the pages of these books. The Hidden Treasure of Glaston was the most ambitious project at 340 pages, but I loved stepping into abbey life, learning more about the process involved in creating illuminated manuscripts, and the mysterious legends of the Holy Grail and King Arthur.



The Squire's Tale by Gerald Morris: (As previously posted..) I'm not sure how, but I came across a series of books by Gerald Morris, retelling the Arthurian legends. I started with The Squire's Tale and am looking forward to proceding through the others. The writing is surprisingly effortless, fresh, and witty. I was quite drawn in. I think my boys will particularly enjoy this series when we revisit Medieval history on the next go-around.

8 comments:

Mandy said...

Thanks for these great recommendations. I am always looking for good books my boys will enjoy.

Sandy Toes said...

My son has to read the Book of Three and the Silver Chair AND Sounder the first quarter.

I was a little apprehensive with the book of 3...is it hard reading?

sandy toe

Heather said...

Thanks for all these great reviews, Heidi! I think I'll add a few of these to my list and to my boys' lists, as well, especially The Invention of Hugo Cabret. I've had my eye on it for some time now, but have never picked it up. I think I'll go ahead and push it to the top of my list... many thanks!

Molly @ A Bit O' Shine said...

The Invention of Hugo Cabret looks a little steampunkish - interesting!

My college roommate played the murdered in our school's play of A Murder is Announced. She even managed to keep it secret from me until I saw it for myself.

Diana (Ladybug Limited) said...

Loved Hugo Cabret! I'll have to check out the others...

Heidi said...

Sandy Toes~ What age is your son. I think The Silver Chair (Lewis, right?) is probably comparable in reading level to The Book of Three. (Although The Book of Three might be somewhat higher as far as maturity goes...)

Chelsea M said...

Never ever tired of your book reviews!! And thankfully my library has most of these. DH asked the other day what the book limit was at the library. I said that I didn't know, but I hadn't reached it yet! :) haha

Renee said...

Great suggestions! Jaybird read Hugo... and The Book of Three... last year. Honestly, I don't always read all of the books before him or even peruse each one first. He is like your Levi, always reading stacks. I cannot keep up. I foolishly recommended Hugo... to my friend's son and the pictures gave him nightmares!! I was so embarrassed. But J just raved and raved about that book and I thought it looked so intriguing. I'll make a note of the others. J just finished up Robin Hood. So maybe one of these would also fit our time period in history this year (early church-medieval). Take care!